Domain suffixes

The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) have announced the extension of domain names which can be used at the end of addresses. At the moment, endings such as .com, .net or .org, as well as country specific ones like .co.uk, are the only ones which are allowed. The ICANN president, Dr. Paul Twomey, told French newspaper Les Echos, “Apart from the .com, .net or .org, the 1.3 billion web users will be able from early 2009 to acquire generic addresses by lodging common words such as .love, .hate or .city or proper names,”

With the likes of .love .xxx .sex being on sale soon, here at glue we are blushing at these somewhat risque options but wondering if we can put in a bid for www.glue.love?

laura LAURA

So, looks like the bell has finally tolled for the stringent regulation of top-level domains. Inevitable really as an exponential number of sites get born onto the web every year. Cybersquatters all over the world must be wringing their hands with glee – how does an individual or company stay on top of registrations against what could be an endless stream of Tesco.cons? And who’ll be allowed to register new ones anyway, or decide what words are “common”? Still, there’s something really exciting about the new release – I’ll finally be able to register all the silly things I always wanted to that were never available. Then hoard them along with the other dozen or so names that I’ve been paying for and not using over the last 10
years…

As a user though, I can’t help thinking that its just going to make things harder for me to find what I’m looking for… relying on remembering the general URL and taking a guess as the top-level domain name just won’t be enough anymore. And what it’ll do for the economy of Tuvalu (.tv) is anyone’s guess…

3 responses to “Domain suffixes

  1. We have found in the past that some suffixes eg: .info have caused a spam warning but only for a limited time and these were in the early days of the .info suffix. This is due to most spam databases being organic and relational so if there is a new common factor in emails being marketing as spam, ie: .xxx suffixes in email addresses there is the chance that this will get flagged early on. I presume that a person had to manually update the databases to allow this but either way I have not had a .info domain being sent from since

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  2. We have found in the past that some suffixes eg: .info have caused a spam warning but only for a limited time and these were in the early days of the .info suffix. This is due to most spam databases being organic and relational so if there is a new common factor in emails being marketing as spam, ie: .xxx suffixes in email addresses there is the chance that this will get flagged early on. I presume that a person had to manually update the databases to allow this but either way I have not had a .info domain being sent from since

    Like

  3. We have found in the past that some suffixes eg: .info have caused a spam warning but only for a limited time and these were in the early days of the .info suffix. This is due to most spam databases being organic and relational so if there is a new common factor in emails being marketing as spam, ie: .xxx suffixes in email addresses there is the chance that this will get flagged early on. I presume that a person had to manually update the databases to allow this but either way I have not had a .info domain being sent from since

    Like

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